20 Common Birds In Indiana (Picture and Sound) in 2022

If you live in Indiana or are just visiting for the first time, you might be interested to know about some of the common birds that call this state home. This post will take you on a journey through the state and introduce you to each of the 20 common birds in Indiana has to offer.

This post will help you identify these beautiful creatures if you ever spot them in your yard, out on a hiking adventure, or just sitting outside with lunch!

21 Common Birds In Indiana (Picture and Sound)
20 Common Birds In Indiana (Picture and Sound)

List of Common Birds in Indiana (With Pictures and Sounds)

Red-bellied Woodpecker – Melanerpes carolinus

These woodpeckers prefer deciduous forests and dead trees for nesting. They use the bark of the decaying trees in their nests for nesting material.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • Length: 8.5-10 in
  • Weight: 2.8-3.3 oz
  • Wingspan: 15-19 in

Sound

Red-bellied Woodpecker sound

Diet

The Red-bellied Woodpecker feeds on insects, spiders, and other arthropods found in dead trees, wood scraps, and yard litter. They can also take many fruits from trees, such as crabapples.

They also feed on suet during the cold winter months. Females will also visit bird feeders and catch insects with their bills.

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a common resident throughout the state.
The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a common resident throughout the state.

Habitat

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a common resident throughout the state, except in the southeastern portion.

Behavior

Red-bellied Woodpeckers breed from May to July in this region. These birds have a gestation period of 18 days, incubating three eggs and feeding their young while they are still in the nest.

White-breasted Nuthatch – Sitta carolinensis

These birds build cup-shaped nests made of twigs and leaves, often on the tops of bushes, limbs, or tree trunks. This bird is a common resident throughout Indiana, except in the southeastern portion of the state, and is a rare visitor south to eastern Texas.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Length: 4.5-5.5 in
  • Weight: 0.4-1.09 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.4-10.9 in

Sound

White-breasted Nuthatch sound

Diet

The White-breasted Nuthatch feeds on seeds, insects, berries, and spiders. They forage for food in trees and shrubbery, especially near their nest site, to provide for the young.

White-breasted Nuthatch is mostly found in deciduous forests with tree species
White-breasted Nuthatch is mostly found in deciduous forests with tree species

Habitat

White-breasted Nuthatch is mostly found in deciduous forests with tree species like beech, poplar, maple, and oak. They may also frequent backyards, parks, and cemeteries for seeds and insects.

Behavior

Nuthatches are very energetic as well as intelligent birds. They often hang upside down from small branches, searching for food. In addition, they are said to have one of the best chip calls among birds.

Mourning Dove – Zenaida macroura

Mourning doves are medium to large-sized with gray heads and dark brown upper bodies. They have long, pointed wings and tails, plump bodies, and two white wing bars.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Mourning Dove
  • Length: approx. 12 in
  • Weight: 4.7-6.2 oz
  • Wingspan: approx. 37–45.1 cm

Sound

Mourning Dove sound

Diet

Mourning doves are seed-eating birds, eating sunflower and millet seeds and grasses and weed seeds.

They do not handle their food with their feet like many other birds; rather, they break the shells off their food using their bills and swallow the kernels whole.

Mourning doves are found in open areas
Mourning doves are found in open areas

Habitat

Mourning doves are found in open areas, like meadows and yards, but they prefer woodlands to protect them from predators.

Behavior

During the breeding season, mourning doves frequently gather in small flocks of about 20 birds, but they tend to be solitary around the beginning of fall and winter.

Mourning doves are well known for their specific cooing sound to communicate with each other.

Indigo Bunting – Passerina cyanea

The Indigo Bunting is a small songbird with a long tail. It has a black face, throat, and breasts with white patches on the wings. The rest of the body is deep blue.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Indigo Bunting
  • Length: 4.2-5.2 in
  • Weight: 0.5-0.75 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.7-10.2 in

Sound

Indigo Bunting sound

Diet

The Indigo Bunting feeds on seeds, berries, insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates. This bird’s diet changes based on the season and food availability.

The Indigo Bunting is a small songbird with a long tail
The Indigo Bunting is a small songbird with a long tail

Habitat

The Indigo Bunting is a very adaptable species. It is found in woodlands and meadows, from stream banks to old fields. During migration, it can be seen in open fields and along forest edges.

This bird migrates southward in the fall, wintering from south Texas to Panama. The Indigo Bunting breeds across the eastern United States and Canada, as well as parts of the Pacific Northwest.

Behavior

Buntings mostly forage on or near the ground, picking up food by sight and sometimes by touch. Males have a feeding area close to the nest and guard it against other birds.

They also frequently perch on wires, posts, or branches of trees, occasionally singing while they wait for their next meal to come along.

Tufted Titmouse

The Tufted Titmouse is one of the most common and abundant birds in Indiana. This species is often mistaken for the Carolina Chickadee, but it can be distinguished by its larger size and white-tipped tail feathers.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Tufted Titmouse
  • Length: 5.5–6.4 in
  • Weight: 0.6–0.94 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.9–10.5 in

Sound

Tufted Titmouse sound

Diet

The Tufted Titmouse is a granivore, meaning it eats small seeds. Mainly, they will eat acorns and sunflower seeds in the fall and winter months. They also take a lot of insects and spiders throughout the year.

Most of these birds’ food is gathered from the ground, but they will also feed on tree seeds and fruits during the late summer and early fall seasons.

The Tufted Titmouse is one of the most common and abundant birds in Indiana
The Tufted Titmouse is one of the most common and abundant birds in Indiana

Habitat

The Titmouse can be found in wooded areas and neighborhoods. They prefer areas that have a good amount of brush to hide in. The Tufted Titmouse is one of the few birds that will build its nest in the same tree year after year.

Behavior

Titmice are very sociable birds that live in groups of 12 to 24 individuals. Their group also consists of both resident and migratory species. Titmice are some of the most common breeding birds seen in Indiana during the spring months.

Dark-eyed Junco

The Dark-eyed Junco is a medium-sized songbird with a white belly, gray back, and a black mark on the side of its head. It has light blue wings and a tail, a dark gray crown, and bright yellow eyes.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Dark-eyed Junco
  • Length: 5.1 – 7.1 in
  • Weight: 0.5 – 1.06 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.1 – 10.5 in

Sound

Dark-eyed Junco sound

Diet

The Dark-eyed Junco feeds on seeds, berries, and insects. This bird nests in trees, bushes, or any other suitable site that offers protection from predators. It is a common bird on the plains of the North American West and winters from South America to Mexico.

The Dark-eyed Junco is a medium-sized songbird
The Dark-eyed Junco is a medium-sized songbird

Habitat

The Junco is a bird that nests in trees, bushes, and any other suitable site that offers protection from predators. It is found in open areas in the northern part of its range and forest clearings in the south.

Behavior

These birds are very social and often form flocks. They will remain with the flock even in the winter and establish territories within the flocks. The Junco is a very active bird that forages for food, often traveling in large flocks.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

The Yellow-rumped Warbler is a small songbird with yellow underparts, gray upperparts, and black streaks on the crown. The rump and tail are white with black outer feathers.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific Name: Yellow-rumped Warbler
  • Length: 12 – 14 cm
  • Weight: 10 – 12.5 grams
  • Wingspan: 18 – 20.5 cm

Sound

Yellow-rumped Warbler sound

Diet

The Yellow-rumped Warbler feeds on insects, spiders, and berries to a much lesser extent than other warblers, as well as seeds and buds of trees and shrubs during the winter months to keep warm and tide them over until spring migration time.

The Yellow-rumped Warbler is a small songbird
The Yellow-rumped Warbler is a small songbird

Habitat

The Yellow-rumped Warbler breeds in Canada, Alaska, and the northern United States, south to central Mexico. This bird migrates south in the fall, wintering from southern Canada to Panama.

Behavior

The Yellow-rumped Warbler forages on or near the ground, sometimes sweeping branches with its bill when searching for insects. This species perches often and often sings while perched.

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker. It is smaller than the Hairy woodpecker and has an all-black head, back, and wings with a white collar on its breast.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific Name: Downy Woodpecker
  • Length: 5.5 to 7.5 in
  • Weight: 0.71 to 1.3 oz
  • Wingspan: 9.8 to 12.5 in

Sound

Downy Woodpecker sound

Diet

Downy Woodpecks eat a variety of insects and other small animals. Their diet changes as food sources change and they are opportunistic feeders.

Habitat

Downy Woodpeckers live near deciduous trees, especially in eastern North America. They live in mixed woodland, brush, or even parks, towns, and cities.

This woodpecker also lives in coniferous forests as well as tropical rainforests of Central America, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico.

Downy Woodpeckers live near deciduous trees, especially in eastern North America
Downy Woodpeckers live near deciduous trees, especially in eastern North America

Behavior

Downy Woodpeckers usually live in family groups. This species searches for food during the day, building a small nest close to a large tree, stump, or platform.

This species will also take over abandoned birdhouses and other hollow cavities. It has been known to make its own nests in cavities in a variety of trees.

Black-capped Chickadee

The Black-capped Chickadee is a medium-sized bird, with a large round head, short bill, and long tail. Adults have black caps and white necks and backs.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Black-capped Chickadee
  • Length: 4,7–6,9 in
  • Weight: 0,39–0,5 oz
  • Wingspan: 6,3–8,35 in

Sound

Black-capped Chickadee sound

Diet

Black-capped Chickadees eat a variety of foods that are available year-round such as seeds, berries, insects, and spiders. They also forage on the ground for larvae and grubs.

The Black-capped Chickadee is a medium-sized bird
The Black-capped Chickadee is a medium-sized bird

Habitat

The Black-capped Chickadee is commonly found in more mesic habitats such as woodlands and forest edges.

It also occupies a broad range of habitats from coniferous and deciduous trees, shrubs, and thickets to some agricultural fields.

Behavior

Black-capped Chickadees eat most of the food that they find on the ground. There is a possibility that they will carry food in their cheeks or in the roof of their mouth as they fly from one place to another. They sometimes let other birds share their food when there is enough.

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Besides being a strong flier, the Eastern Wood-Pewee is an expert at perching. It can sit motionless for long periods of time and is a predator of insects.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • Length: 5.3–6.2 in
  • Weight: 0.35 – 0.49 oz
  • Wingspan: 9.1-10.5 in

Sound

Eastern Wood-Pewee sound

Habitat

The Eastern Wood-Pewee nests primarily in the eastern United States and Canada and also ranges over much of the northern half of Mexico, but there is also a small population in Texas and Arizona.

Besides being a strong flier, the Eastern Wood-Pewee is an expert at perching
Besides being a strong flier, the Eastern Wood-Pewee is an expert at perching

Behavior

This bird is a very social species that can be seen in large flocks. It searches for food by fluttering its wings on the ground or flying up and down tree trunks.

Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal is a very common bird in the wild. It is one of the most familiar birds in North America and is a very colorful bird. This bird has an upright posture and a thin, pointed bill.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Northern Cardinal
  • Length: 8.3–9.5 in
  • Weight: 43 g
  • Wingspan: 8 -12 in

Sound

Northern Cardinal sound

Diet

The Northern Cardinal is a seed eater that enjoys sunflower seeds, pine nuts, berries, fruits, and plants such as thistle and dandelion leaves.

Habitat

The Northern Cardinal prefers to live in deciduous and coniferous forests. It is also found in parks and gardens.

This bird migrates southward in the fall, wintering from east Texas to Panama. The Northern Cardinal breeds across the eastern half of the United States and upper Michigan, as well as into Alberta, Canada.

The Northern Cardinal prefers to live in deciduous and coniferous forests.
The Northern Cardinal prefers to live in deciduous and coniferous forests.

Behavior

Cardinals forage on the ground, sometimes hanging upside down to reach seeds on the lower branches of trees and shrubs. They usually feed in flocks.

Carolina Chickadee – Poecile carolinensis

The Carolina Chickadee (sometimes called the mountain chickadee) is a small, brown-backed bird. It is about the same size as a House Sparrow with a long tail. It has a dark face and throat with light cheeks and white patches on its wings.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Carolina Chickadee
  • Length: 4.6-5.6 in
  • Weight: 0.3-0.45 oz
  • Wingspan: 8.9 – 9.3 in

Sound

Carolina Chickadee sound

Diet

Chickadees feed on different types of seeds, leaves, nuts, and insects. They eat the fruit and seeds of many plants. Their beaks help them to rip open their food.

They do not typically eat meat because they are unable to tear a larger piece of flesh like a raptor. Chickadees will also break open nuts by dropping them on hard surfaces and the peck at some hard foods to soften them up enough to swallow them whole.

The Carolina Chickadee (sometimes called the mountain chickadee)
The Carolina Chickadee (sometimes called the mountain chickadee)

Habitat

Chickadees live in forests, woodlands, parks, and backyards. They are most common in areas with large mature trees and open areas for foraging. Chickadees are often found near bird feeders and hedgerows.

Behavior

Chickadees do not build a nest and do not take care of their young. They lay their eggs on the outside of trees. Chickadees mostly feed on the ground, catching insects and eating fallen seeds.

American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch is a small finch with a gray, yellow, and black back. The male is bright yellow on the head, breast, and rump, with black wings and a tail. Females are duller in color than males.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: American Goldfinch
  • Length: 4.6-5.6 in
  • Weight: 0.35-0.71 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.9 – 9.3 in

Sound

American Goldfinch sound

Diet

American Goldfinch is a seed-eating bird that feeds mainly on weed seeds found in sunflower seeds, which it prefers to all other types of seeds.

This species will also eat some types of fruit but is not as picky about its food source as many other finches are. They are generally foraging on the ground or in bushes, but will also feed on lower branches and shrubs when available.

The American Goldfinch is a small finch with a gray, yellow, and black back
The American Goldfinch is a small finch with a gray, yellow, and black back

Habitat

American Goldfinch breeds in the southeastern United States. The species is found across the northern half of its range but is absent elsewhere.

This finch is a migratory bird, often traveling long distances to winter in the lowlands of Mexico and Central America or even southern South America.

Behavior

American Goldfinch forages at ground level as well as high up in trees, usually perching on a wire or post along the way. The bird usually feeds alone but may gather in small flocks during the breeding season.

If a predator is spotted, the American Goldfinch sways from side to side rapidly as a warning signal to other goldfinches.

House Sparrow

The House Sparrow originated in Mexico and was accidentally introduced to the United States in 1839. It is considered an invasive species because it does not naturally occur anywhere else in the world.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: House Sparrow
  • Length: 5.5 to 7.1 in
  • Weight: 0.85 to 1.39 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.5–9.8 in

Sound

House Sparrow sound

Diet

House Sparrows are omnivorous and have been recorded eating grass, twigs, nuts, seeds, worms and other invertebrates, berries, and lichen from trees or shrubs in their winter range.

The House Sparrow originated in Mexico and was accidentally introduced to the United States
The House Sparrow originated in Mexico and was accidentally introduced to the United States

Habitat

House Sparrows is found in open brushy areas, shrubby areas, and farmland in open fields or meadows.

Behavior

House Finches usually forage in flocks. They will often feed in groups for larger foods like berries, nuts, seeds, and insects. This can make them more susceptible to predation than other birds.

House Finches have a strong social organization with most of their members living in a colony.

Red-winged Blackbird

The Red-winged Blackbird is dark colored with a black head, yellow eyes, and a long bill tipped with red.

The males have black wings with a red shoulder patch, red on the top of the tail, and black spots on the underparts. Females have brown wings edged with red, brown markings on the tail.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red-winged Blackbird
  • Length: 6.5 -9.1 in
  • Weight: 1.2 – 2.9 oz
  • Wingspan: 11.5 -13 in (29-33 cm)

Sound

Red-winged Blackbird sound

Diet

Redwings are omnivores, taking whatever they can find to eat, though they prefer seeds and berries, as well as insects and other small invertebrates. It will also take amphibians and reptiles.

Redwings forage on the ground and in the trees, gleaning their food from leaves, shoots, and branches with their bills. They also may hover briefly before swooping down to capture prey.

The Red-winged Blackbird is dark colored with a black head
The Red-winged Blackbird is dark colored with a black head

Habitat

Redwings are found in fields, parks, and suburbs across the country. They are especially common in areas with mature trees, like forests and woodlands, but can be found as far as suburbs where there is plenty of open space.

This bird migrates throughout North and South America and some species winter in South America. Redwings migrate during the spring and summer months and return north again in autumn.

Behavior

Redwings are very social and often seen in small flocks. They are in constant motion, constantly moving up, down, and back across the trees and bushes.

They like to gather in large flocks around farm fields or other open areas where they can feed.

Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a small, stocky bird with a black head and tail. There are two white wing bars and white edges on the tail. The body and wing feathers are colored brown. Juveniles have brown eyes and no wing bars or tail edges.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Length: 6.3–8.7 in
  • Weight: 1.5-2 oz
  • Wingspan: 10.2-14 in

Sound

Brown-headed Cowbird sound

Diet

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a cowbird that feeds on the nests of other birds. It is a generalist bird and eats many different food items, including insects, seeds, berries, nectar, and grasses.

Habitat

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a North American bird that breeds from Alberta and Saskatchewan east to Newfoundland, south to Florida, and west to Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado. It migrates further south in winter.

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a small, stocky bird with a black head and tail
The Brown-headed Cowbird is a small, stocky bird with a black head and tail

The Brown-headed Cowbird prefers open grassland habitat with scattered clumps of trees or shrubs. It can be found in residential areas as well as rangeland, pastures, parks, and farms.

Behavior

Both the male and female Brown-headed Cowbirds are involved in building the nest. The male deposits pollen and the female collect insects.

The pair defends the nest against other birds and predators. Both adult birds are very aggressive in defense of their nests and will mob larger predators.

Chipping Sparrow

The Chipping Sparrow is a small, sparrow-like songbird with short black legs. The upper body is pale gray and the underparts are white; there are two white wing bars.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Chipping Sparrow
  • Length: 4,7–6,2 in
  • Weight: 0,4–0,65 oz
  • Wingspan: 8-9.4 in

Sound

Chipping Sparrow sound

Diet

The Chipping Sparrow feeds on insects, seeds, berries, and nectar. To obtain food from plants or the ground, it hops like a sparrow but flies like a warbler. It will often flick its tail while foraging.

Habitat

The Chipping Sparrow is a North American bird that breeds from Alaska east to the Atlantic Coast and south to New Jersey and Alabama. It winters on the Pacific Coast, including California and Baja California, Mexico.

The Chipping Sparrow is a North American bird that breeds from Alaska east to the Atlantic Coast
The Chipping Sparrow is a North American bird that breeds from Alaska east to the Atlantic Coast

The Chipping Sparrow prefers open grassland with scattered trees or shrubs near water sources. It can be found in residential areas as well as rangeland, pastures, parks, farms, and meadows.

Behavior

The Chipping Sparrow is very territorial and defends large areas of habitat against other birds. It does not perch like a sparrow but instead hops from one twig to another. It will flush insects and seeds from their hiding places.

Blue Jay

The Blue Jay is a medium-sized bird with a blue head and tail. The body is covered in dark feathers with blue or black streaks. It has bright yellow eyes, a thick beak, and a long crest.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Blue Jay
  • Length: 8.3–11.8 in
  • Weight: 2,5–3,5 oz
  • Wingspan: 13–17.6 in

Sound

Blue Jay sound

Diet

The Blue Jay’s diet consists of various plants, seeds, nuts, and insects. They search for food on the ground or in trees and shrubs. They are known to bury food to retrieve it later, known as caching.

Habitat

The Blue Jay is found in both montane and lowland habitats. Most of their range is located in the eastern and southern United States, but they occur as far north as New England. Blue Jays are social birds and live in large flocks.

The Blue Jay is found in both montane and lowland habitats.

Behavior

The male and female Blue Jays are involved in building the nest in large tree cavities or woodpecker holes. Then, the female incubates and broods the young.

While she is incubating the eggs, the male brings her food. Sometimes he remains near the nest, while at other times, he may leave for up to 15 minutes.

The male plays a role in feeding and defending his young after they hatch

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is a medium-sized bird with large, black-tipped wings and a deep red throat.

The adult male has a black head, neck, and tail, but the female and juvenile birds have green heads. In addition, both sexes have red throats, which tend to change depending on the bird’s mood.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Length: 2.8 to 3.6 in
  • Weight: 0.071-0.15 oz
  • Wingspan: 3-4 in

Sound

Ruby-throated Hummingbird sound

Diet

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is a nectarivore. It feeds on both animal and plant nectar as well as insects. The diet of the Ruby-throated Hummingbird changes depending on the time of year and availability of food sources.

Habitat

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird breeds in the eastern United States from southern Canada and the Great Lakes region to the Gulf of Mexico.

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird breeds in the eastern United States from southern Canada
The Ruby-throated Hummingbird breeds in the eastern United States from southern Canada

It is one of the smallest birds that breeds east of the Rocky Mountains. The nest is built on a tree branch over water, or less commonly, low in a shrub. These birds are often found near bodies of water such as lakes and ponds where insects are plentiful.

Behavior

Both the male and female build the nest and feed the young. A breeding pair will usually have multiple nests close to each other.

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is a colonial breeder, often gathering into large flocks while they migrate and while they are active in late summer. In winter, they tend to split up into smaller groups.

American Robin

The American Robin is a small to medium-sized bird. The male American Robin is mainly chestnut with a black cap. The female American Robin is mainly gray with a lighter throat and breasts.

To differentiate the American Robin from the European Starling, look for the bright red patch on their throats.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: American Robin
  • Length: 9.1 to 11.0 in
  • Weight: 2.5 to 3.3 oz
  • Wingspan: 12 to 16 in

Sound

American Robin sound

Diet

The American Robin is an omnivorous species that have a varied diet. It eats beetles, caterpillars, spiders, flies, and other insects native to its range. It also consumes earthworms, grasshoppers, crickets, and other small arthropods.

Habitat

American Robins are found in the United States and southern Canada open areas. In addition, they can be found in wooded areas, shrubs, and forests near human habitation.

The American Robin is an omnivorous species that have a varied diet
The American Robin is an omnivorous species that have a varied diet

Behavior

Its song is an important identification feature for the bird. The male American Robin has a beautiful two-syllable song ranging from high-pitched whistles to mellow trills.

The birds sing or call almost daily during courtship season, usually between March and June.

Tips to Attract Birds to Your Home

Here’s a checklist to help you draw birds to your home.

  • Provide food and water: provide a birdbath or bird feeder with small enough perches for the birds to land on. If you put your birdfeeder too close to the wall of your house, the birds may eat but not drink.
  • Provide a safe place to live: Birds need safe places to live. Building a birdhouse or a small aviary, even a simple cardboard box, will provide them with safety and security.
  • Create an area for the birds: if you spend time outdoors, such as gardening or jogging, try to wear colors that will attract birds.
  • Be patient: even though the birds may not come immediately, eventually, they will find the food and water sources you created. Don’t give up!
Tips to Attract Birds to Your Home
Tips to Attract Birds to Your Home

Final Thoughts

In this article, we’ve covered 20 common birds in Indiana, including their sounds and images. You can learn more about them on our website. We hope you learned something new and plan to use some of these birds in your next project.

About Dang Thuong

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