24 Birds With Red Heads (Ultimate List, Photos, Sounds)

This is a list of 24 kinds of birds with red heads. Have you ever seen one? Of course, there are many different kinds, but they all have one thing in common: their heads are all red.

You can find a mixture of wild and domesticated birds here. Some live in cold, snowy regions; others prefer warmer climates. All possess some fascinating qualities that make them worth knowing about! Let’s see what we have.

List of 24 kinds of birds with redheads
24 Birds With Red Heads

What birds have a red head?

Here’s a list of 24 amazing and quirky birds with a redhead! Let’s go!

Cassin’s Finch

Cassin’s finches are a small family of nuthatches found in the forests of western North America. They have a wide distribution across Canada and the United States but are not found in the southern part of their range.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Cassin’s Finch
  • Length: 5.5-6.7 in
  • Weight: 1-1.2 oz
  • Wingspan: 9.1-10.7 in

Diet

The Cassin’s Finch feeds on insects and fruits. The most common insect eaten is the spruce budworm, which is the primary source of fat for this Finch through the winter months.

The other mainstay for this bird is pine seeds, mostly from Engelmann spruce but also from Whitebark Pine and Ponderosa Pine.

Cassin’s Finch Sound

Cassin’s Finch Sound
The Cassin’s Finch mainly inhabits the western forests of North America.
The Cassin’s Finch mainly inhabits the western forests of North America.

Habitat

The Cassin’s Finch mainly inhabits the western forests of North America. They prefer coniferous forests, particularly Engelmann spruce-subalpine fir forests at high elevations.

Behavior

Cassin’s Finch breeds from May to July in the north and from February to August in the south. These birds are monogamous and often mate for life.

Males establish their breeding territory and will chase out other males who were able to breed with their mates in previous years. These birds are non-migratory; however, some birds might move downhill when winter approaches.

Nesting

The Cassin’s Finch nests in a relatively shallow cup with densely packed twigs. The clutch is usually 4 eggs, dusky blue or greenish blue with heavy brown splotches.

House Finch

House Finches are small sparrow-like birds with reddish heads and backs.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: House Finch
  • Length: 5.1-6.6 in
  • Weight: 0.7-0.9 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.5 -11,5 in

Diet

The House Finch feeds on seeds, nuts, berries, some insects, and occasionally spiders. It eats while perched or walking around on the ground in an upright position – it walks around in a loop motion. It has a very slow and deliberate gait.

House Finch Sound

House Finch Sound
House Finches are small sparrow-like birds with reddish heads and backs.
House Finches are small sparrow-like birds with reddish heads and backs.

Habitat

These birds are extremely common in cities, suburbs, and towns all over the United States and Canada, where it inhabits can be found on back porches and rooftops, as well as open grassy areas like parks and golf courses.

Behavior

The House Finch breeds across Canada and the United States, mostly in the west of its range, although expanding into eastern areas. It’s an equally common urban and suburban bird and adapts well to human-altered landscapes.

Males are a bright canary-yellow with a brownish back; females are more muted with streaked underparts. They often feed in grassy areas, especially when there are sparrows about.

Nesting

The nest is a cup made of dead weeds and grass. It is placed low in a tree or bush, sometimes partially hidden by the leaves. The female lays 4-6 (very rarely 7-8) eggs, ranging from greenish white to buff with brown splotches.

Purple Finch

Purple Finches are a common sight in the US and Canada. Purple Finches Males have a raspberry red on the head with a fine purple sheen and rest on branches where they appear black.

Purple Finches have short legs and short rounded wings compared to other finches.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Purple Finch
  • Length: 5- 6.5 in
  • Weight: 0.5- 1.2 oz
  • Wingspan: 8-10.5 in

Diet

The Purple Finch feeds mostly on seeds but eats insects, especially grubs and termites. They find their food by hopping along branches, searching for insects or seeds.

Purple Finches also feed on fruit that has fallen from trees or has been left out after a picnic or barbecue.

Purple Finch Sound

Purple Finch sound
Purple Finches Males have a  raspberry red on their head
Purple Finches Males have a raspberry red on the head

Habitat

The Purple Finch is often seen in agricultural areas and opens woodland. They are also common in mixed coniferous, deciduous, and mixed forests.

Purple Finches spend most of their time foraging for food but will become very active during the breeding season. Breeding season for this finch includes spring and fall, but it can sometimes last through the dry summer, although they are primarily a winter bird that migrates south to North America during the winter months.

Behavior

The Purple Finch is a social bird that travels in flocks, sometimes in pairs. They may also form groups with other finches. Like many songbirds, the Purple Finch uses its voice to attract mates, as well as for territorial purposes and to warn off predators.

Nesting

The female Purple Finch lays four to eight eggs per clutch. The eggs are incubated for twelve days before hatching, and the chicks will fledge in an additional twelve days.

Vermilion Flycatcher

Vermilion Flycatchers are medium-sized flycatchers primarily found in grasslands and shrublands.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Vermilion Flycatcher
  • Length: 0.39 -0.59 in
  • Weight: 1.2-2.15 oz
  • Wingspan: 9.7 in

Diet

The Vermilion Flycatcher eats insects, moths, and berries. It will also eat spiders and small reptiles. It is most commonly found eating insects and other soft-bodied prey from a perch or the ground.

Vermilion Flycatcher Sound

Vermilion Flycatcher Sound
Vermilion Flycatchers are medium-sized flycatchers
Vermilion Flycatchers are medium-sized flycatchers

Habitat

The Vermilion Flycatcher can be found in forests from southern Alaska to California and the eastern seaboard to Texas. They prefer open woodland habitats but are also found in coniferous forests and shrubland.

Behavior

This bird is well known as a songbird of birders who travel long distances to catch a glimpse of this very uncommon bird. The song of this interesting bird is a duet between a male and a female. The male sings from a perch, and the female joins in from nearby.

Nesting

The nest of the Vermilion Flycatcher is an open cup made of weed stalks and fine grasses. The nest is built by the female and is lined with leaves or pine needles.

It is placed low in a shrub or tree. Both parents take turns incubating the eggs, which are laid sometime between late April and early June.

Summer Tanager

Summer Tanagers are medium-sized American songbirds. Found mainly in the American Midwest and the eastern portion of the United States, they are named for their bright orange-red breast.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Summer Tanagers
  • Length: 5.5 – 6.9 (cm)
  • Weight: 1.0 – 1.1 oz
  • Wingspan: 25 – 33 cm

Diet

They eat berries, seeds, and insects. They are sometimes seen eating nectar from flowers. The larvae of some moths and butterflies are also on their menu, especially the common Seven-spotted Tiger moth that they often catch while flying over open fields or grasslands.

Summer Tanager Sound

Summer Tanager Sound
Summer Tanagers are medium-sized American songbirds
Summer Tanagers are medium-sized American songbirds

Habitat

These birds breed in many places in the United States, but you will most likely see them in small colonies near trees, bushes, and hedges along a road or field edge.

Behavior

The Summer Tanager is a noisy little bird that chirps and trills, constantly communicating with its mate. They are active birds that usually forage on the ground in low densities, often near dense vegetation.

Nesting

Summer Tanagers form monogamous pairs, which are very territorial in the breeding season. The male selects a nesting site and the female builds the nest, which is made of twigs, rootlets, grasses, and leaves.

She lays 3 to 4 eggs that she incubates for 12 days. When the young hatch they are fed by both parents and leave the nest after about 10 to 13 days.

Red-headed Woodpecker

The red-headed woodpecker has the typical body shape of a woodpecker, with a flat back, short neck, and pointed head.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red-headed Woodpecker
  • Length: 7- 9,5 inches
  • Weight: 2- 3,4 oz.
  • Wingspan: 15 – 17.5 inches (variation)

Diet

This woodpecker normally feeds on insects and other wildlife, but is known to occasionally eat small birds’ eggs.

It is also known to ride tree branches, peaking its head or bill out of the bark to reach prey in the lower branches. It can also be found on the ground where it will peck at ants or worms.

Red-headed Woodpecker sound

Red-headed Woodpecker sound
The red-headed woodpecker has the typical body shape of a woodpecker
The red-headed woodpecker has the typical body shape of a woodpecker

Habitat

Red-headed woodpeckers prefer to live in the milder climates of the United States. They can be commonly seen along the coasts, Pacific Northwest, south and east of the Great Plains, and southern Florida.

Behavior

Red-headed woodpeckers are usually seen alone or in pairs or family groups consisting of a mated pair and their offspring. They tend to be attracted to areas with softwood trees.

Nesting

The red-headed woodpecker makes a nest high in a tree. Female red-headed woodpeckers will lay an average of 4 eggs. The eggs are brown with spots that can be dark brown or black in color.

Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal or Cardinal is a passerine bird. It is the only member of the family Cardinalidae and the genus of the western North American cardinals. It derives its name from its red-orange coloration.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Northern Cardinal.
  • Length: 8.6 – 9.5 in
  • Weight: 1.29-2.4 oz
  • Wingspan: 9 -12.8 in

Diet

The Northern Cardinal feeds on seeds, berries, and insects and has been known to feed on shellfish and small lizards such as lizards. Its diet consists of seeds, berries, and insects, and has been known to feed on shellfish and small lizards such as lizards.

Northern Cardinal sound

Northern Cardinal sound
The Northern Cardinal or Cardinal is a passerine bird
The Northern Cardinal or Cardinal is a passerine bird

Habitat

They can be found in woodlands and residential areas with shrubs or trees, but not usually in deep forests. They are common in parks and gardens throughout most of North America north of Mexico.

Behavior

The Northern Cardinal is a social bird and commonly gathers in large flocks. It is active during the day and usually comes and goes in short spurts, although it can be found on the ground at night.

Cardinals are sexually dimorphic birds, with males having brighter plumage than females. The males sing most of the year.

Nesting

The nest is an open cup made of bark, stems, twigs, and grasses and placed in a shrub or low tree branch. The female lays two to four eggs that are a pale sea-green color.

Fledglings leave the nest about 12–14 days after hatching, although they often return to the nest to roost. Young cardinals are dependent on their parents for food for about 30–35 days after leaving the nest.

Pyrrhuloxia

The Pyrrhuloxia is a genus of cardueline finches that includes one species, the female pyrrhuloxia.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Pyrrhuloxia
  • Length: 6-8.7 in
  • Weight: 0.5 oz–1.8 oz
  • Wingspan: 8-12 in

Diet

Pyrrhuloxia feeds mostly on seeds and also eats some insects. It often feeds on seeds from thistles, knapweeds, and other weeds or at bird feeders. It is also known to pick through the trash for food, as well as eat insects that it finds there.

Pyrrhuloxia sound

Pyrrhuloxia sound
Pyrrhuloxia is a genus of cardueline finches that includes one species
Pyrrhuloxia is a genus of cardueline finches that includes one species

Habitat

Pyrrhuloxia is commonly found in open grassy areas like fields, meadows, parks, and golf courses. It also can be spotted near bushes or trees where it likes to eat some of its food sources.

Pyrrhuloxia is also smart enough to hide in tall grass or brush, or in unoccupied buildings and trees.

Behavior

Pyrrhuloxia mainly eats around the wet season when there is plenty of food. It likes to be near water as well, so it can hide near a stream, pond, or lake during the day and come out at night to eat.

Nesting

In the wild, the male pyrrhuloxia builds his nest in a tree, especially if it is near a water source. The female lays 6-10 (very rarely 12) eggs, which are greenish-white to buff with brown splotches.

Red Crossbill

The Red Crossbill is a small bird about the size of a sparrow. The male has a red head and black bib, with a grey back and wings. The female is similar in color to the male but she has no red on her head and she has white stripes on her back.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red Crossbill
  • Length: 17 – 20 cm
  • Weight: 1 -2.5 ounces (26 g)
  • Wingspan: 25 – 27.5 cm

Diet

Mainly seeds, fruit, and insects; occasionally spiders and other arthropods are taken as well as some vegetable matter. They sometimes feed on the ground near the ground level.

They forage for prey by moving to a perch, where they wait quietly for their prey to come within range of their beaks.

Red Crossbill sound

Red Crossbill sound
The Red Crossbill is a small bird about the size of a sparrow
The Red Crossbill is a small bird about the size of a sparrow

Habitat

Found in the northern regions of Canada and the United States, in small flocks or individually.

Behavior

These birds are gregarious and don’t migrate. They fly swiftly and silently. Their flight is undulating but can be direct when chasing prey or escaping from predators.

They are only heard when they sing their songs in the winter months, which are shrill and rapid. This is often heard while they fly into the stiff breezes of a winter storm.

Nesting

The nest is a shallow cup made of moss, grasses, and twigs. The female lays about 6 eggs that are cream-colored with brown spots.

The eggs are incubated for 14 days. The young leave the nest in about 17 days and are fed by both parents.

Pine Grosbeak

The Pine Grosbeak is a large finch, about the same size as a House Finch. It is mainly found in open and wooded areas.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: The Pine Grosbeak
  • Length: 10–11 cm (3 in)
  • Weight: 1.5 – 2.8 oz
  • Wingspan: 1.33–1.9 cm

Diet

Pine Grosbeaks are seed eaters (pine seeds and juniper berries) in the summer and buds in the winter. They also eat some insects.

Pine Grosbeak sound

Pine Grosbeak sound
The Pine Grosbeak is primarily a boreal bird
The Pine Grosbeak is primarily a boreal bird

Habitat

The Pine Grosbeak is primarily a boreal bird, breeding in coniferous forests across Canada and the northern United States.

They nest higher in trees than other finches, and can be found throughout much of Canada during the summer months, then migrating southward toward the United States in the fall.

Behavior

The male sings during courtship, to defend territory and to attract a female. She is the main nest builder. Pine Grosbeaks will sometimes nest in mixed flocks with other finches, which may include Red Crossbills and American Goldfinches (all are seed eaters).

Pine Grosbeaks are particularly aggressive toward other members of their own species and will chase them away from food sources.

Nesting

Pine Grosbeaks nest in a conifer, laying 4-5 blue-green eggs with brown spots. Eggs are incubated by the female for 12–14 days.

Scarlet Tanager

The Scarlet Tanager is bright red and black in color. It usually has a perched position that is both upright and stiff. Its song is a series of short, high-pitched trills, sometimes backward.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Scarlet Tanager
  • Length: 6.3 – 7.5 in
  • Weight: 0.82- 1.5 oz
  • Wingspan: 8.5-11.5 in

Diet

The Scarlet Tanager is an omnivorous bird, which means it eats plants and animals, although its main diet is its fruits and berries.

The tanager hunts for insects like lizards, butterflies, and spiders on trees and branches, as well as on the ground where it can walk slowly and steadily in an upright position.

Scarlet Tanager sound

Scarlet Tanager sound
The Scarlet Tanager is bright red and black in color
The Scarlet Tanager is bright red and black in color

Habitat

Scarlet Tanagers can be found in open woodlands, forest edges, and even suburban areas.

Behavior

The Scarlet Tanager is a common bird of the southeastern United States and southern Canada, where it inhabits thickets of deciduous and coniferous trees.

It breeds in eastern North Carolina and much of the east coast south to Texas. Scarlet Tanagers are territorial birds that defend small territories within their breeding range.

Nesting

The Scarlet Tanager nests in a tree or bush, usually with holes made in the sides of the nest for their eggs. The female lays 3-5 eggs, which are light to medium blueish in color. Both parents feed the chicks.

Scarlet Tanagers generally breed twice a year and can produce two broods per season if conditions are right.

Red-breasted Sapsucker

The Red-breasted Sapsucker is a small and very common member of the sparrow family. It is about the size of a small blackbird (the same size as the Eurasian Tree Sparrow).

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red-breasted Sapsucker
  • Length: 7.3 – 8.8 in
  • Weight: 1.7-2.9 oz
  • Wingspan: 14.5 – 16,7 in

Diet

The diet of this bird consists of insects like insects, spiders, and small caterpillars, as well as sap from trees. It feeds by placing its bill onto a tree and then drilling into it.

Red-breasted Sapsucker Sound

Red-breasted Sapsucker Sound
The Red-breasted Sapsucker is a small and very common member of the sparrow family.
The Red-breasted Sapsucker is a small and very common member of the sparrow family.

Habitat

It can be found in open areas with tall trees, especially Riverwood and damp grassy areas.

Behavior

Young birds are duller in color than adults and have a scruffier appearance. Mature birds have a slightly brighter yellow head, paler breasts and back, and a distinctive black wing patch.

Nesting

The nest is a cup made of dead grasses, twigs, and weed stems. It is built in small trees or shrubs and is usually made on a tree branch. Both the male and female incubate the eggs, which are laid 3-4 days apart.

Common Redpoll

Redpolls are small, active finches with large heads and short tails. Their plumage is soft, powdery-gray with black streaks.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Common Redpoll
  • Length: 3.75- 5.5 in
  • Weight: 0.4- 0.6 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.5- 8.3 in

Diet

Redpolls feed on seeds, which they find by sifting among the soil and rocks of their habitat. They also eat insects and humus when available.

Common Redpoll Sound

Common Redpoll Sound
Redpolls are small, active finches with large heads and short tails
Redpolls are small, active finches with large heads and short tails

Habitat

Common Redpolls live in coniferous areas such as spruce and mixed deciduous forests. They are commonly found in meadows but can also be found in agricultural areas and coniferous areas near towns.

Behavior

Common Redpolls are common in bird feeders and feeder seed mixes. They are often seen in flocks and during the breeding season may form large groups. Common Redpolls display many natural behaviors such as perching, singing, foraging, and preening.

Nesting

The female Common Redpoll builds the nest using grass or plant stems and leaves. The nest is round with a smooth surface to prevent water from pooling, which can cause problems for the chicks.

Red-Headed Conures

Red-Headed Conures are small parrots that originate from the tropical forests of Central and South America. The Red-Headed Conure is very colorful, with a bright red head and a green body.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red-Headed Conures
  • Length: 20 to 24 in
  • Weight: 5.5 to 7.5 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.5- 8.3 in

Diet

The Red-Headed Conure resides primarily on plant material or seeds found in tropical forests of Central and South America (they eat insects as well).

They also eat fruits and nuts in the wild, although they are not as fond of sweet things as other parrots. Red-Headed Conures are omnivores and will eat a variety of food that is well within their nutritional needs.

Red-Headed Conures Sound

Red-Headed Conures Sound
The Red-Headed Conure is very colorful, with a bright red head and a green body.
The Red-Headed Conure is very colorful, with a bright red head and a green body.

Habitat

The Red-Headed Conure is an altitudinal migrant that prefers the higher forests of Mexico and Central America (up to an elevation of 2,000 meters).

At those elevations, this small parrot has sufficient food to feed its small size. However, at lower altitudes, it tends to feed more on the ground and in palm trees.

Behavior

The Red-Headed Conure is a social bird and lives in flocks of up to twenty that roost together at night. These flocks are scattered throughout the riverine habitats.

In the daytime, they are more active and have short flights from tree to tree. During breeding season (mating occurs between January and August) these conures tend to be found in pairs.

Nesting

The Red-Headed Conure nests in tree cavities and on the ground. The female lays one to four creamy, green eggs with a pink to red tint (depending on the hen’s gender), which measure between 19.5 and 25.5 millimeters in length.

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is a small woodpecker with black and white speckled plumage.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Downy Woodpecker
  • Length: 5.3- 7.4 in
  • Weight: 0.7 -1.4 oz.
  • Wingspan: 9.8 – 12.4 in

Diet

The Downy Woodpecker feeds mostly on insects, including ants, beetles, and insect larvae. They also feed on fruits, nuts, and seeds.

The Downy Woodpecker is known to be a very aggressive feeder, so he is often seen pecking at the ground or even fighting with other woodpeckers in order to get his food.

Downy Woodpecker sound

Downy Woodpecker sound
The Downy Woodpecker is a small woodpecker with black and white speckled plumage
The Downy Woodpecker is a small woodpecker with black and white speckled plumage

Habitat

Downy Woodpeckers are easily identifiable due to their loud call and red-bellied black-and-white coloring. They are often found in the deciduous forests of Eastern North America.

Downy Woodpeckers are most commonly seen in suburban areas and have made themselves very comfortable in backyards and parks.

Behavior

The Downy Woodpecker can be found alone or in flocks but is usually only located near sources of water. The Downy Woodpecker is a ground feeder and uses its strong beak to dig out holes in dead trees or stumps in search of food.

Female Downy Woodpeckers usually don’t remove large amounts of bark to find food, but instead, only pry off the outer layer of bark or small twigs.

Nesting

The Downy Woodpecker lays 5-8 eggs in a tree cavity or abandoned woodpecker hole. The female will incubate the eggs for 12–14 days before they hatch.

Anna’s Hummingbirds have a ruby throat and chin, with a greenback, and are about the size of a sparrow, weighing only an ounce.

Anna’s Hummingbird

Size & Shape

  • Scientific Name: Anna’s Hummingbird
  • Length: 4 – 5 in (10 – 12cm)
  • Weight: 0.2 – 0.3 oz (7 – 9 grams)
  • Wingspan: 3.6 -4.5 in

Diet

Anna’s Hummingbirds feed on mainly nectar, but insects make up the rest of their diet. They can hover while they drink nectar from flowers or feed on insects by snatching them out of the air.

Anna’s Hummingbird Sound

Anna’s Hummingbird Sound
Anna's Hummingbird can be found in western North America
Anna’s Hummingbird can be found in western North America

Habitat

Anna’s Hummingbird can be found in western North America. They prefer areas with a warm, dry climate, and can be found in open scrubland.

Behavior

Anna’s Hummingbirds also have blue throats and brown backs. They are like many other hummingbirds because they have long oval-shaped bills to reach nectar from flowers.

They will hover while feeding and when they are alarmed, they may raise their wings over their back like a crest. They also have a very curious nature, which is why they are so often seen near people.

Nesting

Anna’s Hummingbirds lay one to two eggs per clutch and they incubate them for 14 days before hatching. The chicks will fledge in another 16 days

Pileated Woodpecker

The Pileated Woodpecker (also known as a Pileated or Dryocopus Pilatus ) is a large bird that is native to North and South America (from Canada in the north to Argentina in the south).

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: pileated Woodpecker
  • Length: 15-19 in
  • Weight: 184-350 g
  • Wingspan: 20-27 in

Diet

The Pileated Woodpecker eats a variety of insects, especially ants and termites. It also eats other small animals, including eggs and nestlings of birds and mammals.

Pileated Woodpecker sound

Pileated Woodpecker sound
The Pileated Woodpecker is a large bird that is native to North and South America
The Pileated Woodpecker is a large bird that is native to North and South America

Habitat

The Pileated Woodpecker can be found in deciduous, mixed, and coniferous forests. It is also common in urban areas, especially near buildings where it can get food from grease around the drains or tree bark.

The Pileated Woodpecker has a large black patch on each side of its head that makes them look like they have a black square hat there (hence “pileated”).

Behavior

The Pileated Woodpecker lives in groups of 2-6 which almost always consist of a male, a female, and a young of the year. They live in holes in either standing or dead trees.

They are very territorial (especially during the breeding season) and it is not uncommon for males to fight over territory.

Nesting

The female lays between 4-9 eggs. The young hatch 16-18 days later and stay in the nest for about 4 weeks.

Crimson Sunbird

The Crimson Sunbird is a medium-sized passerine and has red legs, bill, and breasts. They are native to Africa and have olive-brown upper parts and a grey throat with some whiter on the lower chest.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific Name: Red-billed Sunbird
  • Length: 11 – 15 cm
  • Weight: 4.3-9.5 kg

Diet

The Crimson Sunbird eats grass seeds, insects, spiders, and fruit. The Crimson sunbird is also known to opportunistically take small reptiles, amphibians, and small mammals.

Crimson Sunbird sound

Crimson Sunbird sound
The Crimson Sunbird is a medium-sized passerine and has red legs, bill, and breasts
The Crimson Sunbird is a medium-sized passerine and has red legs, bill, and breasts

Habitat

The crimson sunbird is found in open woodland with dense tree cover. They inhabit areas with a variety of different habitats including savannahs, grasslands, and forests with tall trees such as baobabs.

Behavior

The crimson sunbird is sexually monomorphic. These birds have been observed to engage in competitions for mates during the breeding season. The crimson sunbirds are also known for their loud songs and will call to attract a mate.

The crimson sunbird is a common bird in its natural range but can be threatened by habitat loss.

Nesting

The female crimson sunbird lays around three to four eggs. The incubation period takes approximately ten days. The average lifespan of an adult crimson sunbird is two years

Western Tanager

Western Tanagers are found in western North America, from the Pacific Northwest to Colorado and New Mexico. Their breeding habitat is open wooded areas with large trees or a forest canopy.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Western Tanager
  • Length: 6-7.75 in (14 – 20 cm)
  • Weight: 0.8-1.5 oz (25-42 g)
  • Wingspan: 12-13.5 in (31-37 cm)

Diet

Western Tanagers mostly eat fruit and insects, but also eat seeds and berries. They are good at catching insects in the air or from branches. They will sometimes take the time to pluck a leaf off of a branch and use it as a tool to help catch some of their prey.

Western Tanager sound

Western Tanager sound
Western Tanagers are found in western North America
Western Tanagers are found in western North America

Habitat

Western Tanagers are found in open woodland, parks, and gardens.

Behavior

Western Tanagers feed on the ground or on branches, where they hop and catch insects with their feet. They often mimic the calls of other birds. Like many birds, the Western Tanager uses its voice to attract mates, as well as for territorial purposes and to warn off predators.

Nesting

Western Tanagers will nest in holes or under bridges and tree trunks. The female will lay three to five eggs.

Brazilian Tanager

The Brazilian Tanager is a large finch that has bright red breasts and a dark brown head with a red stripe or “mask.” The female is similar but darker overall. The male has a blackish tail band and brown crown, while the female has a yellow head and back.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Brazilian Tanager
  • Length: 7.5-8 in (19 cm)
  • Weight: 1-1.3 oz
  • Wingspan: 13-14 in (33-36 cm)

Diet

The Brazilian Tanager eats various fruits, as well as spiders and insects.

Brazilian Tanager sound

Brazilian Tanager sound
The Brazilian Tanager is a large finch that has bright red breasts
The Brazilian Tanager is a large finch that has bright red breasts

Habitat

Brazilian Tanagers are most common in the Amazon Rainforest in South America. They can be found in other tropical brush areas and deciduous forests too.

The Brazilian Tanager is a very active bird and will constantly move from branch to branch. They are most active in the morning, afternoon, and evening. During their migration, Brazilian Tanagers use their beaks to fly or glide short distances.

Behavior

Brazilian Tanagers are an extremely social species of birds that lives in flocks of varying sizes (4-30). Flock members often forage for food together or travel to different parts of the forest together.

The flocks consist of the same individuals from one year to the next, with a few new members added each year. Even though these birds are social and live in large flocks, they can still be spotted alone, foraging for food.

Nesting

The female Brazilian Tanager lays 2-4 eggs in a nest that she constructs out of grasses and other plant material. The female will incubate her eggs for 12-13 days before they hatch.

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a bird of the east and south from Canada to Bolivia. It is often called the “hairy woodpecker” because it has a red crown and back, but no wings or tail.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Hairy Woodpecker
  • Length: 7-10.8 in
  • Weight: 1.3-3.6 oz
  • Wingspan: 9 – 17 in

Diet

The Hairy Woodpecker feeds on insects, during spring and summer months, mostly ants. It often feeds alone, but will join mixed-species foraging flocks.

Hairy Woodpecker sound

Hairy Woodpecker sound
The Hairy Woodpecker is a bird of the east and south from Canada to Bolivia.
The Hairy Woodpecker is a bird of the east and south from Canada to Bolivia.

Habitat

The Hairy Woodpecker can be found in many habitats. It lives in boreal and temperate forests, preferring conifers and using dead or decaying wood to excavate nest holes. It can also be seen in suburban areas and even deserts.

Behavior

The Hairy Woodpecker has many different calls, including “kent, kent” and “pik”. It also makes a “chick” call to announce its territory.

Nesting

The Hairy Woodpecker builds its nest and excavates holes in dead trees and stumps. It uses the holes to excavate nests, storing food in them during the summer months. It will mate with more than one female and may use several different nest cavities for each female with the same or separate mates.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were once very much feared by humans and were referred to as “fierce killers.”

Naming these birds was always a difficult task for scientists because of their relatively short lifespan and their habit of nesting in the tops of trees where they are practically impossible to find.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Length: 2.5-3.5 in
  • Weight: 0.036-0.12 oz
  • Wingspan: 3.2-4.4 in

Diet

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is an omnivore, feeding on fruit, flowers, insects and spiders. The food sources are plentiful throughout their range and the bird rarely has to stray far from its home territory to find food.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird Sound

Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were once very much feared by humans
Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were once very much feared by human

Habitat

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are only found along the southern reaches of the United States, Mexico, and northern Central America. They live in a variety of habitats, ranging from forests to deserts.

Their preferred habitat is open areas with plenty of trees, but they will tolerate a wide range of open woodlands, prairies, and croplands with shrubs also. A single Ruby-throated Hummingbird may have up to 20 different feeding areas within its territory.

Behavior

The ruby-throated hummingbird is a solitary species. It will only feed at night, and even then it is more likely to be alone than not. They are very difficult to observe in the wild because they are so well camouflaged.

Ruby-throated hummingbirds hover in the air and their wings move so rapidly that they appear like a blur. This behavior prevents them from being detected by predators.

Nesting

Ruby-throated Hummingbird nests are cup-shaped and are usually placed off the ground. The majority of nests are built on the tips of branches in trees or shrubs, but they will occasionally build them on hanging vines. Nesting sites can be up to 11 feet above the ground.

Acorn Woodpecker

The Acorn Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is stocky and has a square tail. These birds peck up the insects that live inside of the hole or scoop them out with their tongue.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Acorn Woodpecker
  • Length: 7.5-11 in
  • Weight: 2.5-3.2 oz
  • Wingspan: 13.5-15 in

Diet

The Acorn Woodpecker is an insectivore and eats almost solely on tree-dwelling insects, which it digs out with its sharp beak.

They are known for their fierce attacks on the bark of trees where they search for insects. They also eat nuts and fruit when available, especially acorns, hence their name.

Acorn Woodpecker sound

Acorn Woodpecker sound
The Acorn Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is stocky and has a square tail.
The Acorn Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is stocky and has a square tail.

Habitat

Acorn Woodpeckers tend to live in wooded areas with trees that contain large amounts of dead wood or woodpecker holes. They can also be seen in areas of forests that are cultivated or disturbed.

In the winter months, Acorn Woodpeckers migrate south to warmer climates.

Behavior

Acorn Woodpeckers are very territorial and are typically seen as one or two pairs in a single territory. They will defend their territory by displaying their bright feathers and puffing out their chests, which can be seen from a distance away.

Nesting

The female Acorn Woodpecker will lay between three and eleven eggs per clutch. The eggs are incubated for thirteen days before hatching, and the chicks will fledge in another thirteen days.

Scarlet Honeyeater

The Scarlet Honeyeater is found in the Kimberley region of Western Australia and the Northern Territory. The Scarlet Honeyeater is a medium-sized Honeyeater with a long tail and long pointed wings which are held above the body.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Scarlet Honeyeater
  • Length: 3.5-4.5 in
  • Weight: 0.25 – 0.29 oz
  • Wingspan: 7.1 in

Diet

The Scarlet Honeyeater is a nectarivore that feeds on nectar, seeds, and insects. They frequent the blossoms of banksias, grevillea, and eucalyptus trees, swallowing the nectar and then storing it in a special stomach, turning it into sugar by the bird’s digestive juices.

Scarlet Honeyeater Sound

Scarlet Honeyeater Sound
The Scarlet Honeyeater is a medium-sized Honeyeater
The Scarlet Honeyeater is a medium-sized Honeyeater

It has been noted that they will consume pollen but only at a specific stage of flowering and only in certain species.

Habitat

The Scarlet Honeyeater is commonly found in open woodland and scrub, although it may also be found near human habitation.

Behavior

It often holds its wings close to the body, sometimes behind it on its back or even folded down over itself.

The scarlet honeyeater is a very vocal bird and can be heard for several kilometers through the open forest. They tend to make a noise similar to insects and other sounds like trilling or squeaking, although the trill sounds like a goat.

Nesting

The Scarlet Honeyeater has a strong pair bond that can last for life.

After mating, the female will lay one to two eggs daily, depending on food availability. The eggs are incubated for twelve days, and the young will fledge after twelve.

Final Thoughts

Now that you’ve seen the 24 birds with red heads list, I hope you are enthralled. With so many different birds in the world and so much to learn about, there is certainly no shortage of things to do and see!

If you enjoyed this post or any other on my website, please share it with your friends (the links are at the top!). Thanks for reading.

About Dang Thuong

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