28 COMMON BIRDS WITH ORANGE CHESTS (FULL LIST)

You seem to be having trouble learning about birds with orange chests. You’ve found the right place, then.

In this post, you’ll learn all about 28 common birds with orange chests. You can see pictures and audio of each bird, and read some information about them. I recommend bookmarking this page for later use. Enjoy your reading!

28 common birds with orange chests (with pictures)
28 common birds with orange chests (with pictures)

Types Of Birds With Orange Chests

Here’s a list of some of the most beautiful orange-colored birds’ breasts you’ll ever see:

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole is a beautiful bird with yellow wings and orange-breasted. They are often mistaken as just another type of sparrow.

Diet

Baltimore Orioles eat all types of bugs, including mosquitos and other pesky insects that can carry diseases like the West Nile virus, malaria, dengue fever, and Lyme disease.

Baltimore Oriole is a beautiful bird with yellow wings and orange-breasted
Baltimore Oriole is a beautiful bird with yellow wings and orange-breasted

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Baltimore Oriole
  • Length: 6.7 – 7.5 in
  • Weight: 1.1-1.4 oz
  • Wingspan: 9.1 to 11.8 in

Habitat

Baltimore Orioles are found all over North America, from farms to prairies and meadows. They make their homes in trees.

Behavior

The Baltimore Oriole is named after the city of Baltimore, Maryland, where it was first described by George Ord in 1815.

It breeds in eastern North America, and winters to the south of its breeding range in Central America, South America, and the West Indies.

Males are usually more brightly colored than females. Its breeding habitat is open woodland with some undergrowth as well as scrub, hedgerows, and suburban gardens with mature trees.

Typical Sound

The Baltimore oriole makes a distinctive “chuck” call, which is given while flying. Its whistling song also can be heard belted from the treetops while they weave their hanging nests.

Baltimore Oriole sound

Bullock’s Oriole

The bullock’s oriole is one of the most beautiful orange-breasted birds you will see. It gets its name from the large serrated bill (or tube which is shaped like a bull’s horns). This bird is also called the black-billed oriole.

Diet

Bullock’s Orioles eat insects and spiders, eating almost anything they can find including beetles, grasshoppers, dragonflies, ants, and caterpillars.

The bullock’s oriole is one of the most beautiful orange-breasted birds
The bullock’s oriole is one of the most beautiful orange-breasted birds

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Bullock’s oriole
  • Length: 6.6 – 7.7 in
  • Weight: 1.1 – 1.5 oz
  • Wingspan: 11- 12.5 in

Habitat

Bullocks’ orioles are found in the western half of the US. They are usually found in a habitat that is close to the water and near thickets of dense undergrowth.

Bullocks’ orioles live in the forest and woodlands, where they build their nests.

Behavior

Bullocks’ orioles are not migratory birds, but they do move to more northern areas during the winter season.

During the spring, they begin to sing out loud as they begin their mating rituals, ready to mate and raise a new family in their homemade nest.

Typical Sound

Bullocks’ orioles sing out loud, with a mixture of soft and harsh calls. Its canary-like song has been described as a subdued version of the Baltimore orioles. They are very active birds and enjoy flying up high when searching for food.

Bullock’s Oriole sound

Allen’s Hummingbird

Allen’s Hummingbird is the second smallest bird in North America. They spend their summers in the western United States, but some travel to Alaska, while others southeast to Mexico.

Diet

Allen’s Hummingbirds feed on nectar from flowering plants and insects, including spiders, flies, and ants. They take a long time to drink nectar from their food source.

Allen's Hummingbird is the second smallest bird in North America
Allen’s Hummingbird is the second smallest bird in North America

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Allen’s Hummingbird
  • Length: 3 – 3.9 in
  • Weight: 0.08 to 0.11 oz
  • Wingspan: 4.3 – 5.2 in

Habitat

Allen’s Hummingbirds inhabit the arid parts of Mexico, the northern and southwestern United States, and the southern half of Canada.

They usually live in open woodlands or scrublands with sparse herbaceous growth. They also inhabit deserts where there are small pools of water.

During the breeding season, these birds are found in areas with a dense growth of bushes and low shrubs that provide cover for their nests. They are also found in open areas with bare soil where they can find prey to feed on.

Behavior

These hummingbirds are very territorial. They will often attack other hummingbirds that fly into the colony’s vicinity.

During the breeding season, males defend territories in mixed shrubs and woods located in coastal canyons. Allen’s hummingbirds have even been seen chasing red-tailed hawks and American kestrels from their territories (Allen’s Hummingbird – Channel Islands National Park (U.S, 2016)

https://www.nps.gov/chis/learn/nature/allens-hummingbird.htm

The Allen’s hummingbird is the only species of hummingbird that will not hibernate in the winter. They will migrate to warmer climates in the fall and return to their nesting grounds in the spring with their mates.

Typical Sounds

The hummingbird has a wide variety of calls and songs that can help identify the species. These sounds are given when flying or hovering near their food source:

  • The hover call is a short and fast call given by a bird facing the source of food from above. It is used to tell other hummingbirds where to find a good food source.
Allens Hummingbird sound

American Robin

The American robin is a plump bird with orange breasts and a gray back. It is one of the first birds to sing in the morning, often at dawn.

Diet

The American robin eats mainly insects but also consumes earthworms, berries, and fruits. In winter, its diet switches to main fruits as insects become scarce.

The American robin is a plump bird with orange breasts and a gray back.
The American robin is a plump bird with orange breasts and a gray back.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: American Robin
  • Length: 9.1 – 15.6 in
  • Weight: 1.5 to 2.5 oz
  • Wingspan: 8 – 16 in

Habitat

The American Robin is a migratory bird. They will migrate to warmer climates in the winter months and return to their summer homes in the spring.

These birds inhabit woodlands, farmland, and parks. In their summer habitats, the American Robins can be found foraging on lawns or flying between trees or shrubs. These birds roost in large flocks at night

Behavior

The American Robin is a fairly easy-to-find bird. They are usually located in areas such as forests and parks.

During summer they can be found perching on low branches of trees or in the middle of large groups of other birds. The American Robins have a very loud call, often heard after dark on hot summer nights.

Typical Sounds

The American Robin makes a distinctive “chew-ink” call, which is usually uttered while flying. Its distinctive “pi-wit” song can be heard over almost any habitat in the country, especially during the breeding season.

American Robin sound

American Woodcock

The American woodcock is chunky, with dark brown eyes and orange-colored breasts. It has a mottled brown back, rusty sides, and a dark tail.

Diet

The American Woodcock is a carnivorous bird that feeds on earthworms and other invertebrates. This bird is also fond of berries and fruit.

On winter days, this bird consumes mainly insects. The American Woodcock can be found in deciduous forests and meadows in their summer habitats, but they will migrate to open fields in the wintertime.

The American woodcock is chunky, with dark brown eyes and orange-colored breasts
The American woodcock is chunky, with dark brown eyes and orange-colored breasts

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: American Woodcock
  • Length: 10 – 12 inches
  • Weight: 7 – 10 ounces
  • Wingspan: 17.5 – 24 inches

Habitat

American Woodcock can be found in wooded areas across North America. In their summer homes, they reside on the outskirts of forests or along woodland edges or clearings.

When winter comes, they prefer open fields but can occasionally be found in tall grasses.

Behavior

Woodcocks roost in fields and forests where there are plenty of shrubs for cover. Their feathers are camouflaged to blend in with their surroundings, thus making it difficult for predators to spot them.

During the early evening, hours woodcocks feed on earthworms and other insects on the forest floor. They fly about in low bushes, looking for earthworms and eating them.

Typical Sounds

They make a “peent” sound while flying in the air, a call that earned them their name. In-flight they produce loud, clear whistles to communicate with each other as well as with birds of different species.

American Woodcock sound

Barn Swallow

The Barn Swallow is a bird found in the United States and Canada. It is also known as the House Finch and Rock Pigeon in some areas.

Its genus name derives from its tendency to build domed nests of mud smeared with mud pellets.

Diet

Barn swallows are omnivores. They eat both small seeds and nectar. The main foods the barn swallow consumes are insects, spiders, caterpillars, moths, and other insects.

In winter barn swallows will eat seeds of many types, including grains. Some of the seeds that barn swallows eat are corn, spring wheat, and rye.

The Barn Swallow is a bird found in the United States and Canada.
The Barn Swallow is a bird found in the United States and Canada.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Barn Swallow
  • Length: 5.5 – 7.5 in
  • Weight: 1.2-1.4 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 7.5 to 12.5 in (approx. )

Habitat

Barn swallows can be found in the following habitats: woodlands, parks, and farmlands

Behavior

Barn swallows often perch on fences or buildings to rest during the day. They are among the first birds to arrive at a feeding site in spring and will often fly up trees to forage for insects.

Barn swallows will also drop out of trees at night to feed on fruit, which is why they are occasionally referred to as small fruit-eating birds.

Typical Sound

This bird has a soft whistle-like call that is most often heard during the morning and evening. This bird also makes an audible “zing” noise when flying, making a “ching” sound as it lands on wires or other perch.

Barn Swallow sound

Red-breasted Nuthatch

These birds can be found in most areas of the United States. They prefer living in coniferous trees, especially pine and spruce trees. They are known for their habit of climbing down tree trunks head-first.

Diet

The diet of the Red-breasted Nuthatch consists mainly of insects and nuts, but they will also eat seeds and fruit. Some favorite foods include beetles, ants, wasps, spiders, acorns, and tree frog eggs.

They will work very hard to open up pine cones so they can get to the nuts inside.

The red-breasted Nuthatch is a migratory bird.
The red-breasted Nuthatch is a migratory bird.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Length: 4.3 – 5.9 in
  • Weight: 0.3 – 0.7 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 6.9 – 8.1 in (approx.)

Habitat

The red-breasted Nuthatch is a migratory bird. They will migrate to warmer climates in the winter months and return to their summer homes in the spring. These birds inhabit woodlands, farmland, and parks.

In their summer habitats, the Nuthatches can be found climbing on tree trunks or up branches. They also frequent bird feeders in large numbers. These birds nest in cavities of trees or limbs of bushes.

Behavior

The Red-breasted Nuthatch is fairly easy to find. They are usually located in areas such as forests, fields, and parks.

During the breeding season, these birds can be found in the middle of large groups of other birds. They are a “doubly whistled” bird and make a high-pitched call that can be heard on any warm spring morning.

Typical Sound

The red-breasted Nuthatch makes a high-pitched “chee-too” call. It also has a distinctive double raspy call. The song sounds somewhat like high-pitched chatter.

Nuthatch sound

Eastern Towhee

The Eastern Towhee is a small, sparrow-like bird with a long and toothless bill. The male Eastern Towhee has a distinctive and melodious song that it sings throughout the day.

Diet

Despite the length of its bill, the Eastern Towhee does not eat much solid food. Its diet consists mainly of insects, but it will also eat berries, seeds, and leaves.

The Eastern Towhee is a small, sparrow-like bird with a long and toothless bill.
The Eastern Towhee is a small, sparrow-like bird with a long and toothless bill.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Eastern Towhee
  • Length: 7.5 – 9.5 in
  • Weight: 1.6 – 2.8 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 10.5 – 12 in (approx.)

Habitat

The Eastern Towhee lives in fields, marshes, or wooded areas. They are also found in urban regions such as parks.

These birds can be found foraging on grassy meadows, brushy areas, and agricultural fields during the summer months. At other times of the year, they will be found in more woodland areas.

Behavior

Towhees forage for food in leaf litter or under the bark of trees. They will also use grass stems to poke into holes searching for insects. These birds also eat berries and seeds from berries, so they can be found on branches where fruits are growing.

They spend most of their time on the ground but will perch in trees to escape predators such as hawks or owls.

Typical Sound

The Eastern Towhee has a pleasant cry that sounds like it is saying “teacher, teacher.” It makes this call while perched in trees or while flying between trees.

They have another call that sounds like “towhee,” which they will use to advertise their territories.

Eastern Towhee sound

Black-headed Grosbeak

The black-headed grosbeak is a medium-sized bird with rust-colored plumage and a black head. It is found in forests and other woodlands throughout the United States hunting insects, berries, and seeds. When disturbed it makes a “chirping” call.

Diet

The Black-headed Grosbeak is a generalist in its diet, feeding on grasshoppers, flies, and other insects.

Occasionally they are known to eat small berries but mainly feed on insects. They will also drink nectar during the summer months.

The black-headed grosbeak is a medium-sized bird with rust-colored plumage and a black head.
The black-headed grosbeak is a medium-sized bird with rust-colored plumage and a black head.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific Name: Black-headed Grosbeak
  • Length: 7 – 8 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 1.1 – 1.8 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 11 – 12 in (approx.)

Habitat

Black-headed Grosbeaks tend to be associated with deciduous woodlands, including forest edges and swamps.

During the winter they can be found in thickets and shrublands. They are often found on the ground as well as high up in trees.

Behavior

The Black-headed Grosbeak is a very active bird with a large range of motion. These birds are very territorial and will often snap at other birds that get too close to their nest.

Typical Sound

The Black-headed Grosbeak can be found by its call which is a quiet “chee chee.” The Black-headed Grosbeaks make a loud “meow” when they are excited and alert.

Black-headed Grosbeak sound

Bullock’s Oriole

The bullock’s oriole is a small bird with a large orange beak. It has black and white coloring on its underparts, but the back is gray and the tail is black.

The name “bullock” of the oriole comes from their call made by mixing blue notes with a whistling sound.

Diet

These birds eat a variety of foods, ranging from fruits to insects. They also enjoy eating some types of sap, such as honeysuckle sap.

Saps are secreted by certain plants when they are injured or disturbed in any way. These saps contain sugar and can be collected and eaten by Bullock’s Orioles or other birds and animals.

The bullock’s oriole is a small bird with a large orange beak
The bullock’s oriole is a small bird with a large orange beak

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Bullock’s Oriole
  • Length: 5.5 – 7.8 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 1.0- 2.0 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 7-12.5 in (approx.)

Habitat:

Oaks, rhododendrons, and some other trees in the midwest United States. Bulls are found in dense woods, often near lakes and ponds.

Behavior

Bullock’s Orioles prefer to nest in a large tree cavity or nest hollow and only use tree cavities that have easy access to food sources or a nearby water source.

They will only build their own nests if there are no suitable tree cavities around. These birds are migratory, meaning they travel to different areas of the country depending on the season.

Typical Sound

The call of Bullock’s Orioles is a series of soft “whee-ee” notes. The song is a little more complex and includes a series of “pip-pip” notes, followed by whistles.

Bullock’s Oriole sound

Eastern Bluebird

The Eastern Bluebird is a medium-sized bird with blue plumage. It has two distinct color phases, one with a light blue breast and belly and one with an orange or rusty breast and belly.

Diet

The Eastern Bluebird is an omnivore. Their diet consists mostly of insects, but they will also eat fruit, nectar, and plant buds. Their favorite foods are beetles, grasshoppers, dragonflies, and caterpillars.

The Eastern Bluebird is a medium-sized bird with blue plumage
The Eastern Bluebird is a medium-sized bird with blue plumage

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Eastern Bluebird
  • Length: 5 ½-7 in (approx.)
  • Weight:0.7-1.2 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 8 – 12.8 in (approx.)

Habitat

Eastern Bluebirds are found throughout the eastern and central U.S., although their numbers have been declining due to habitat loss and pesticides.

They like to make their homes in areas with open skies and woodlands, including parks and backyards.

Eastern Bluebirds spend the winter months in South America, migrating back north in the spring. During these migrations, they often travel in large flocks that fly back and forth in large V-shaped patterns.

Behavior

Eastern Bluebirds have strong family bonds. They mate for life and stay together raising their young each year until one partner dies or they are no longer able to reproduce.

These birds are very territorial, and they will make their presence known to other bluebirds in the area with their loud, clear calls.

Typical Sound

The Eastern Bluebird makes a high-pitched call that is often heard during the breeding season, especially in the early morning or late afternoon.

The male Eastern Bluebird will make a very distinctive “zzztk” sound, usually made when flying from one branch to another

Eastern Bluebird sound

Orange-breasted Sunbird

The Orange-breasted Sunbird is one of the smallest birds in the world. Despite its tiny size, it has a very distinctive orange breast.

Diet

The Orange-breasted Sunbird mainly eats bugs and worms, like beetles and ants. They also eat berries and seeds like thistle seeds and corn kernels.

They are known to be social birds that will form groups of their kind.

The Orange-breasted Sunbird has the ability to spot prey with binoculars, these birds will fly in erratic patterns when they spot prey. They have a loud, aggressive call that can be heard from one to several miles away.

The Orange-breasted Sunbird is one of the smallest birds in the world.
The Orange-breasted Sunbird is one of the smallest birds in the world.

Size and Shape

  • Scientific name: Orange-breasted Sunbird
  • Length: 4.5 – 7.2 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 0.2-0.5 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 6 – 8.5 in (approx. )

Habitat

Orchard Oriole and the Orange-breasted Sunbird both live in large groups, usually in groups of 10-15 members. They can be found in most habitats, though they generally prefer to live near water.

They are sometimes caught by the Orchard Oriole’s call.

Behavior

Orchard Oriole and the Orange-breasted Sunbird will both eat insects and berries, but they will also eat other foods including fruits and seeds.

The Orange-breasted Sunbird is a social bird, they will form groups with up to 20 members.

The Orchard Oriole and the Orange-breasted Sunbird both fight for food and mates. This can be seen when one bird sees another bird eating and will “jump” on the other bird and begin fighting for their food.

Typical Sound

Orchard Oriole’s call is often repeated by Orange-breasted Sunbirds during mating season.

Orange-breasted Sunbird

Hooded Oriole

The Hooded Oriole is a bird of the oriole family. Its range includes the southern United States from southeastern Arizona and New Mexico.

In addition to its native range, it has also been introduced to Bermuda, where it is now established on the main island.

Diet

The diet of the Hooded Oriole consists mainly of insects that they catch in flight. They will also eat fruits and nectar. Some favorite foods include grasshoppers, crickets, ants, and spiders.

The Hooded oriole also feeds on fruit and is usually seen in the same places as it eats insects

The Hooded Oriole is a bird of the oriole family.
The Hooded Oriole is a bird of the oriole family.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Hooded Oriole
  • Length: 6.9 – 8.2 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 0.5-0.9 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 8 – 11.5 in (approx. )

Behavior

These birds gather together in large flocks during the summer months when they migrate to new nesting grounds. During these gatherings, they fly back and forth in large V-shaped patterns.

It is currently listed as the least concern based on a declining population and habitat loss, but the birds remain common in most areas where they are found.

But because of their nocturnal habits and their tendency to form flocks during migration, they are easily seen at feeders.

Typical Sound

The Hooded Oriole has a series of musical, slurred whistles at night, but is otherwise fairly silent. The song of this bird sounds quite different from that of other orioles.

Hooded Oriole sound

Altamira Oriole

The Altamira Oriole is quite similar in appearance to the Orchard Oriole, but the coloring on its chest is more yellow than orange.

Diet

This bird’s diet is similar to that of the Orchard Oriole. It eats mostly insects, fruits, and nectar, but it will occasionally eat small frogs or snakes.

The Altamira Oriole is quite similar in appearance to the Orchard Oriole
The Altamira Oriole is quite similar in appearance to the Orchard Oriole

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Altamira Oriole
  • Length: 7.5 – 10.5 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 0.8 – 2.5 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 10 – 14.5 in (approx. )

Habitat

Altamira Orioles live in the eastern portion of Mexico, the western part of Central America, and a few small areas of South America.

They often nest in the crooks of tree branches or in palm fronds. The bright colors on their chest are used to attract mates during their mating season which takes place from March through May.

Behavior

The Altamira oriole is a shy bird and is very rarely seen when not singing. Whenever it is seen, it flits from branch to branch, searching for insects and berry fruits.

The Altamira oriole is frequently found in groups of 6 or 7 birds, flying over long distances and displaying “dance-like” movements.

The Altamira oriole sings from the top of large trees, where it will perch for several minutes at a time.

Typical Sound

The song is a pleasant ringing sound with a metallic quality: “teew-teew-teew “. It is often repeated with very little variation. The call is an angry rattle that sounds like “swee tah”.

Altamira Oriole sound

Spot-breasted Oriole

The Spot-breasted Oriole is a beautiful bird that is found in woodlands, gardens, and parks throughout much of Mexico and Central America.

Diet

The diet of the Spot-breasted Oriole consists mainly of fruits, nectar, and insects.

The Spot-breasted Oriole is a beautiful bird that is found in woodlands
The Spot-breasted Oriole is a beautiful bird that is found in woodlands

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Spot-breasted Oriol
  • Length: 7.5-9 inches
  • Weight: 1.4-1.6 ounces
  • Wingspan: 12.5-14 inches

Habitat

The Spot-breasted Oriole inhabits rainforests. They spend their day perched high up in the canopy of tall trees, often near waterfalls. They live in large flocks near swamps and rivers.

Behavior

The Spot-breasted Oriole is usually found high up in the treetops during the day, and they will descend to the forest floor at night to roost. It is a gregarious bird, often found in large groups of up to 100 birds.

Typical Sound

The call of the Spot-breasted Oriole is a short, soft, high-pitched “klee”. Usually, this bird sings a song that includes “klees”, and is often preceded by a minute or two of soft warblings.

The male sings this song as he flies in his territory, and sometimes while he is perched. He also sings it to the female when courtship occurs.

Spot-breasted Oriole sound

American Redstart

The American Redstart is the state bird of Louisiana.

Diet

These birds eat large amounts of insects and use their strong bills to dig into logs in search of ants and beetles. They have also been known to eat seeds, berries, and amphibians.

The American Redstart is the state bird of Louisiana.
The American Redstart is the state bird of Louisiana.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: American Redstart
  • Length: 5 – 6 in
  • Weight: 0.2-0.5 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 6.9 – 7.5 in (approx. )

Habitat

Brown Thrashers prefer areas close to water such as near rivers, lakes or swamps. They tend to avoid human development and can be found in wooded areas with tall trees and brush.

Behavior

The Brown Thrasher’s song is loud, long and melodious, composed of many different sounds such as whistles, warbles, clucks and trills.

They are territorial birds who will use their combined calls to mark their territory.

Typical Sound

This bird has a few different song types all based on their size. Medium-sized birds usually have a high-pitched, short song, while small birds have a long, slow song.

American Redstart sound

Blackburnian Warbler

The Blackburnian Warbler is a small songbird with a brilliant orange-red throat and breast. The males have black heads, while the females have gray-brown heads.

Diet

The Blackburnian Warbler is primarily insectivorous but will eat small fruits, berries, and seeds. It eats in flocks and will sometimes land in trees with others of its species.

The Blackburnian Warbler is a small songbird with a brilliant orange-red throat and breast.
The Blackburnian Warbler is a small songbird with a brilliant orange-red throat and breast.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Blackburnian Warbler
  • Length: 4.5 – 5.7 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 1 – 1.2 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 10 cm (approx.)

Habitat

Blackburnian Warblers are fairly common birds in the east. They are primarily found near wooded areas, especially thickets and thick brushy fields.

They roost in large groups for the winter months, often also joining other species to keep room.

Behavior

Blackburnian Warblers are fairly easy-to-find birds, usually found in tall grasses, the edges of trees and shrubs, or in thickets.

During the winter months when insects are scarce, they feed on nuts and grains.

They will lead a very similar life as other warblers such as Black-throated Green Warbler, but is not exceptionally fast-moving and isn’t quite so territorial about their feeding territory.

Typical Sound

Blackburnian warblers have a sharp, piping call that sounds like zip zip zip. The male also makes high-pitched whistles and chirps.

Blackburnian Warbler sound

Brambling

The Brambling is a bird species of the tit family Paridae. They are native to Europe and Asia.

Diet

The diet of the Brambling consists mainly of insects and seeds, but they will also eat fruits, nectar, and yeast in small amounts. Some favorite foods include spiders, beetles, and caterpillars.

The Brambling is a bird species of the tit family Paridae
The Brambling is a bird species of the tit family Paridae

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Brambling
  • Length: 15.5 – 16.7in (approx.)
  • Weight: 22 – 23.1 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 22 – 26 cm(approx.)

Habitat

The brambling is found in forests, woodlands, and scrublands in Europe and Asia. They prefer areas with dense vegetation.

Behavior

Bramblings migrate south to warmer climates during the winter months, but they do not hibernate. They tend to gather together in large flocks during the summer months when they have young young to protect and feed.

Typical Sound

Bramblings have high-pitched, noisy calls. They can also make many other sounds including purring and whistling.

Brambling sound

Western Bluebird

The Western Bluebird is a medium-sized songbird with blue plumage. It is found in western North America, from Alaska to Arizona and New Mexico.

Diet

Western Bluebirds mainly eat bugs, fruit, and sap.

They are opportunistic feeders, eating many different insects and small animals. But they will also sometimes eat berries and seeds when they are available in the areas where they live.

The Western Bluebird is a medium-sized songbird with blue plumage.
The Western Bluebird is a medium-sized songbird with blue plumage.

Size and Shape

  • Scientific name: Western Bluebird
  • Length: 6.5- 7.9 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 0.7-1.2 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 9-12.5 in (approx.)

Habitat

Western Bluebirds prefer to live in open countries with shrubs or trees, and a source of water nearby. They can be found throughout the west coast of the U.S., including Alaska, Canada, and Mexico.

Behavior

During the breeding season, western bluebird pairs are very territorial, singing duets and chasing off intruders of the same sex.

Though this level of territoriality generally decreases after breeding has finished, they remain together year-round.

Pairs will roost together in bush tangles and will defend those areas year-round. The western bluebird is often a cavity nester, using natural cavities such as holes in trees and dead snags.

Typical Sound

The song of the Western Bluebird is a soft mellow warble, often given just before dawn. Western Bluebirds are also known for their “twittering” sound, made by rapidly flicking their tongues against the roofs of their mouths.

Western Bluebird sound

Northern Cardinal

The northern cardinal is a small bird with a black head, back, and wings. The Northern Cardinal is one of the first songbirds to sing in the spring.

Diet

These birds are omnivores, meaning they will eat both plants and animals. Common foods include small insects, seeds, grains, fruits, and berries.

The northern cardinal is a small bird with a black head, back, and wings.
The northern cardinal is a small bird with a black head, back, and wings.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Northern Cardinal
  • Length: 7.5 -9.1 in
  • Weight: 1 -1.2 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 10 -11 in (approx.)

Habitat

The Northern Cardinal inhabits woodlands and suburban areas. They use deciduous trees for nesting.

In the summer months, these birds can be found foraging on lawns or flying between trees or shrubs. These birds roost in large flocks at night

Behavior

The Northern Cardinals are fairly easy to find. They live in groups and perch at the tops of trees. During summer they can be found perching on low branches of trees or in the middle of large groups of other birds.

The Northern Cardinal has a very loud call, often heard after dark on hot summer nights.

Typical Sound

The Northern Cardinal makes a distinctive “weedle-deedle” call, which is usually uttered while flying. Its distinctive “chickadeedee” song can be heard over almost any habitat in the country, especially during the breeding season.

Northern Cardinal sound

Varied Thrush

The Varied Thrush is a large bird with a long brown tail, dark wings, and white underbelly. The male and female Varied Thrush look alike.

The word “varied” in this bird’s name refers to the wide variety of calls it makes. It can imitate the calls of over 60 other birds and animals, often blending several at once to sound like a small group of animals.

Diet

Varied Thrushes are omnivores and eat an assortment of foods ranging from snails to berries and insects to small mice.

The Varied Thrush is a large bird with a long brown tail, dark wings, and a white underbelly.
The Varied Thrush is a large bird with a long brown tail, dark wings, and a white underbelly.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Varied Thrush
  • Length: 7.5 -9.1 in
  • Weight: 2.1 – 2.5 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 11 -15.6 in (approx.)

Habitat

Thrushes prefer to live in forests and woodlands but will adapt to the habitat where they live. They are rarely found outside of the forest, which can be found anywhere from the treetops to ground-level plant life.

Behavior

The Varied Thrush is found in temperate regions all across the United States and Canada. It nests in a tree or bush, but during migration, they will stay in groups in trees or bushes.

The call of this bird is unmistakable and can be heard on quiet summer evenings.

Varied thrushes are very approachable for such a shy bird, sometimes even allowing humans to get close enough for a photograph.

Typical Sound

The Varied Thrush is well-known for its ability to imitate other birds and animals. Its call is a loud “whew-hehew.” The bird also makes whistles, buzzes, clucks, and growls.

Rufous Hummingbird

The Rufous Hummingbird is a small hummingbird with a rufous-brown back, rump, and upper tail. It has white wing bars and a prominent eye patch which is surrounded by black.

Diet

Rufous Hummingbirds like to eat nectar, but they will also eat small insects. Some favorite food sources include tree sap, spiders, and sap-sucking insects called aphids.

Occasionally the Rufous Hummingbird will eat tree lichens, insects that live in dead trees and snails.

The Rufous Hummingbird is a small hummingbird with a rufous-brown back
The Rufous Hummingbird is a small hummingbird with a rufous-brown back

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Rufous Hummingbird
  • Length: 2.5 -4.0 in
  • Weight: 0.1 – 0.3 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 4.5 in (approx.)

Habitat

Rufous Hummingbirds are found throughout North America, in a large range that includes Canada and Alaska.

The hummingbird population migrates south during the winter months and stays in southern states and Mexico.

Behavior

The Rufous Hummingbird is commonly found in gardens, parks and yards. The bird nests in cavities in trees such as hollow trees, stumps or the feet of the Todilidae family of bats.

It is very active during the day and night, usually perching on fences or poles near flowers.

Typical Sound

The Rufous Hummingbird makes a characteristic buzzing sound while it is flying. Even though this bird can sing, it just makes a buzzy “raspy” hum. Birds make this sound when they are disturbed or anxious.

Rufous Hummingbird sound

Northern Red Bishop

This bird has a red-orange chest, black back and white belly. The Northern red bishop is well known for its amazing song in flight.

Diet

The diet of red bishops consists mainly of other insects and seeds. They will also eat fruits and nectar. Some favorite foods include beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, ants, and wasps.

The red bishop has a short nest that is built in a tree cavity or on the ground area near a tree trunk.

Their nests are usually made out of grass and lined with bark. Red bishops build their nests in colonies found in woodlands and prairie areas.

The red Bishop is mainly a ground feeder.
The red Bishop is mainly a ground feeder.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Red Bishop
  • Length: 9 – 13 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 0.4-0.6 oz(approx.)
  • Wingspan: 5.9-7.5 in (approx. )

Habitat

Red Bishops are found in woodlands, agricultural fields, and parks. They inhabit deciduous trees and shrubs. Although not a bird of water, red bishops do inhabit wet areas with puddles and streams.

In the winter months, these birds migrate to warmer climates within Mexico, Central America, and southern California.

During the winter they shelter at lower elevations in the mountain areas where there are large numbers of other Red Bishops that they can congregate.

Behavior

The red Bishop is mainly a ground feeder. They will fly up into the trees to roost in the evening, but they are not known as great fliers.

Red Bishops gather in large flocks during the summer months while they migrate to new nesting grounds.

During these gatherings, they fly back and forth in large V-shaped patterns. Because of the Red Bishop’s small size, they are preyed upon by hawks, owls, and other birds.

Typical Sound

Northern Red Bishop song is a low, vibrating, buzzy ‘chur-chur-chur’ sound. The male sings this song from the top of treetops or wires

Northern Red Bishop sound

Western Tanager

Western Tanagers live in the western parts of North America. They eat mainly insects and berries.

Diet

Western Tanagers are granivores and insectivorous. Their diet consists mainly of insects such as aphids, beetles, bees, flies, and wasps, but they will also eat fruit such as wild cherries and elderberries.

They will occasionally even eat bird eggs and nestlings; they usually hunt by sitting quietly on a tree branch or wire.

Western Tanagers are granivores and insectivorous.
Western Tanagers are granivores and insectivorous.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Western Tanager
  • Length: 12–16.5 cm (4½–6¾ in)
  • Weight: 31–46 g (0.82-1.57 oz)
  • Wingspan: 19–22.5 cm (7½–11 in)

Habitat

Western Tanagers live in very different habitats, such as woodland edges, scrubland, forest clearings, and suburban neighborhoods.

In the winter they will join flocks of other species of birds to find food more effectively.

Western Tanagers live in the western parts of North America. They can be found west of the Rocky Mountains from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

Behavior

Western Tanagers are very social, joining mixed-species flocks to find food and for foraging protection. They also form flocks during their wintering months.

Typical Sound

Western tanager calls are high pitched, with a buzzy quality, but do not have any distinct pattern as compared with other finch species.

Western Tanager sound

Scarlet Tanager

The Scarlet Tanager is a bird that is very commonly seen during the summer months. It is named for its bright red feathers and was chosen as the state bird of Connecticut in 1985.

Diet

The Scarlet Tanager eats mostly insects but also eats fruits and berries. It is often seen eating wild cherries and blackberries because they are abundant in summer fruit.

The Scarlet Tanager is a bird that is very commonly seen during the summer months
The Scarlet Tanager is a bird that is very commonly seen during the summer months

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Scarlet Tanager
  • Length: 6 – 7.8 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 0.9-1.6 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 11 – 13 in (approx.)

Habitat

Scarlet Tanagers live in both Australia and New Guinea. They inhabit all types of forests, including eucalyptus, and pine forests. They are also found in rainforests, pine forests, and wet grassland areas.

Behavior

Scarlet Tanagers are mostly seen alone or with a mate during the spring and summer months as they prepare for the breeding season.

They fly up and down branches, sometimes staying in the same tree for hours. However, they move to a new location every day or two.

Typical Sound

The Scarlet Tanager can be heard calling at night during the spring and summer months. Its call is a cheerful whistle of five notes that go rapidly up and down as if it were singing “chee-cher-ee-chee”.

Scarlet Tanager sound

Stonechat

The Stonechat is the state bird of Colorado. It was named after Thomas Skene, a Scottish missionary and trader who had been a member of William Drummond’s expedition to Colorado in 1823.

Diet

The diet of the Stonechat consists mainly of marmots, but also includes bugs, seeds, berries, and fruits. Some favorites include beetles, grasshoppers, and caterpillars.

The Stonechat is the state bird of Colorado.
The Stonechat is the state bird of Colorado.

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Stonechat
  • Length: 4.5 – 6 in (approx. )
  • Weight: 0.46 – 1 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 7 – 9 in (approx. )

Habitat

The Stonechat lives in a wide range of habitats and will breed almost anywhere there is cover and enough space for it to build its nest. Typical habitats include farmland, grassland, and moorland.

During migration, they visit coastal areas and can be spotted at several bird reserves including the RSPB reserve on the Isle of Sheppey, Kent.

Behavior

The Stonechat is a highly territorial species and will defend its territory with aggressive chipping and dive-bombing.

It will also sing from a hidden position to advertise its ownership of a given territory. During this process, it flies from branch to branch and ground to aerial with short rapid wing beats.

In courtship, the male performs a series of aerial displays, and the female responds with her own.

Typical Sound

The most common call of the Stonechat is a low-pitched “charrrrr”. It is similar to the song sung by the Song Thrush. It may also use a very loud “chraaak” call in a warning.

Stonechat sound

Spotted Towhee

The Spotted Towhee, also known as the Crested Titmouse, is a very common bird in North America. It breeds in open areas ranging from the Canadian Prairies, through much of New England, and down to Mexico.

Diet

The diet of the Spotted towhee consists mainly of seeds. They will also eat berries, insects, and small spiders.

The female will collect and store food for her young. Once they are born, their parent carries them on their backs to get them started on their own diet of seeds.

The Spotted Towhee, also known as the Crested Titmouse
The Spotted Towhee, also known as the Crested Titmouse

Size & Shape

  • Scientific name: Spotted Towhee
  • Length: 5.5-8.5 in (approx.)
  • Weight: 1.3 – 1.7 oz (approx.)
  • Wingspan: 7 – 11 in (approx.)

Habitat

They make their homes in dense shrubs and trees, close to the ground. They like to live near rivers, ponds, or lakes, where they can find insects for food. They are usually found alone or with one other bird.

Behavior

These birds stay close to the ground, but they can be seen in flight. They will fly swiftly, calling out as they go. they have small flapping wings that are short and pointed.

Typical Sound

Their calls are very high-pitched and harsh. They generally make two different kinds of calls: a long whistle (staccato) for danger, and a higher-pitched trill for communication among themselves.

Spotted Towhee sound

Final Thoughts

Do you have a favorite bird with an orange chest? I hope you enjoyed learning about these birds. My goal is to help you learn as much as possible while having fun doing it too.

Ultimately, American Birding Expo hopes these birds will become more than just an interesting fact for you. Those animals that we share our homes and planet with are unique. The more we understand them, the more respect and awe they will engender in us.

About Dang Thuong

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